Tag Archives: line art

Desk Rose (digital art)

Practicing with some workflow concepts—changing from paper to digital. I made a simple drawing of a rose and some sage leaves that I had on my desk. I liked the layout and the composition. I kept wanting to add more, but I made myself stop, realizing it was just enough.

Filed Under: Art
European Landscape – Digital, line

European Landscape – Digital, line

This was a short study in using simple lines to convey depth and perspective. I didn’t pre-measure, just launched in to the drawing, using my hands and eyes. I am still working on developing the connectivity between what my eyes see and what I can bring to paper. I’m sure this is going to be an ongoing process, with many iterations, for the rest of my life. I’m happy with this because I was able to get so much out of it being minimal in my approach. (To view at a higher resolution, click here.)

Ink and graphite on paper, 9″x 6″.

Landscape - Lines Drawing

Filed Under: Art
Quarry (Ink Drawing)

Quarry (Ink Drawing)

This drawing is based on a picture I took. I visited a local quarry. It was so pretty! I was enchanted with the light and dark of the landscape, and the planes of the rocks. This is a study sketch that I felt came out really well. (To view at a higher resolution, click here.)

Quarry - Ink Drawing

Filed Under: Art
Making a Sketch into Digital Work – Aubrey

Making a Sketch into Digital Work – Aubrey

I am revisiting some of my earliest portrait sketches this week. Aubrey, drawn in June 2015, is what I began working on today. It was a short drawing session, but I can already tell that it was helping me edit the sketchy-sketchy lines in the original drawing. I like seeing her in block-style black-and-white contrast. I tend to really enjoy line drawings with just a touch of watercolor effect, and that is what I’ll be doing the rest of week! Enjoy her second rebirth as a digital artwork!

 

Aubrey’s first set of definitive digital lines.
Aubrey - Line Work Beginning

Aubrey’s second set of lines, showing the underdrawing.

Aubrey - Lines, Digital, 2

Aubrey, solid digital lines with underdrawing removed.

Aubrey - Solid Digital Lines

 

 

Filed Under: Art
Lily Nouveau (digital drawing)

Lily Nouveau (digital drawing)

After looking at lots of fantastic photography featuring female models with swirly hair, I felt like drawing a woman with fantastic hair! I also made an effort to use different line thickness—to accentuate certain features. I also like the idea of making contour lines bold—a technique my favorite portrait artist (Anthony Ryder) uses that I think enlivens any portrait work. “Lily” took on the style of Art Nouveau, but I think that she is beautiful, and for a two-hour freehand drawing, really encouraging.

Lily Nouveau - Portrait, Line

Filed Under: Art
Half of All T-Rexes Were Female (design, art)

Half of All T-Rexes Were Female (design, art)

A Facebook friend of mine, a few weeks ago, looked at my T-rex line drawing and said, “I would wear that as a t-shirt if it said, “Half of all t-rexes were female,”” so yesterday and today I’m playing with the idea. I downloaded the Jurassic Park font, threw it on there, and began manipulating in Photoshop. This is a fun concept. In a weird way, I’m not sure what the slogan means exactly, but it seems feminist-empowering. Plus, I realized I had not once thought about a T-rex being female, always assumed malT-Rex Female - Bright Greene. Which do you like better: bright green or dark green?

T-Rex Female - Dark Green

 

Filed Under: Art
Watercolor Symmetrical Flowers (digital)

Watercolor Symmetrical Flowers (digital)

 radial symmetrynoun, BIOLOGY:
symmetry around a central axis, as in a starfish or a tulip flower.

Digital art. I spent some time playing with the radial symmetry tool in Sketchbook Pro. I selected 16 points of radial symmetry, (for extra credit – see: forms of radial symmetry in nature) the scale ranging from 6 to 16, and got these lovely, intricate, fun flower shapes. I used a watercolor pen on a lower layer and added some color to be more cheerful and dynamic. This was just a calm and meditative thing to do — I might very well take up making these in the future, just for relaxation. I love flowers — so this was great.

Watercolor Symmetrical Flowers

Filed Under: Art
Coy Duck (digital, WIP)

Coy Duck (digital, WIP)

After living on a sailboat for seven months, I’ve developed a friendly relationship with a sweet pair of Mallard Ducks. They were wary at first, but after repeated feedings and sweet-talking, they are our little pets. I see them a few times a day, either paddling their feet in the water up to the back of the boat, or what has happened a lot more recently, they’re standing on the dock, waddling up to me and eating food straight from my hand. How cute is that? Because I obviously adore these animals, and have a million pictures of them on my phone already (lots of reference pictures,) I decided to make a drawing of the female duck.

The low resolution original of a drawing taken from a reference photo. Doesn't she have a sweet face?
The low resolution original of a drawing taken from a reference photo. Doesn’t she have a sweet face?

 

I increased the resolution from my original line drawing, and reoriented her slightly.
I increased the resolution from my original line drawing, and reoriented her slightly. There is still a lot of work to do, but the building blocks are happening.

 


Using the drawing I have so far, I’m just playing with some colors. I want to get a feel for how the rest of this drawing is going to work. I am asking myself some stylistic questions.

  • Or shall I take it to a realistic level?
  • Do I want to keep it minimalist?
  • Should I do a line art against a solid background?
  • Will it be a line drawing?

I don’t know the answers to these questions yet, but I’m keeping them in my thoughts as I’m working.


Here are some simple color choices, for fun:

Coy Duck - Blue 02
A light blue duck.

 

A yellow (ochre) duck.
A yellow (ochre) duck.

 

A red (rust) colored duck.
A red (rust) colored duck.

 


 

I have some decisions to make about what direction this is heading. I also need to spend time cleaning up the lines that represent her feathers. I am many processes away from being able to color her, so it’s nice to play with colors and be loosely brainstorming them before my line-clean up / decision-making process. The little glimmer of instant-color satisfaction is very heartening to me. More on Miss Duck to come! Quack, quack.

Filed Under: Art
Six Succulents (digital art, version 1)

Six Succulents (digital art, version 1)

SIX Succulents

This is my first real attempt at coloring digitally. I’m using Sketchbook Pro to draw and to color. Getting used to this program has been a real pleasure. I’m learning a lot about using layers to my advantage in order to build up colors, as I would be with painting using physical paints. Merging layers and making layers transparent really helped me get a feel for color integration. I hope to do many more of these works — with succulents in particular, as they are so full of color and interesting line shapes. They are also just plain adorable and I think they’re fascinating.

Here’s my process as I went along, starting with the original picture I took with the beginning lines.

I hope you enjoy seeing the pictures of the process. I know it’s been educational for me to see the progress, and very encouraging.

 

The original reference image with digital drawn-in-lines visible.
The original reference image with digital drawn-in-lines visible.

 

Cleaned digital lines, minus the reference image. I used black because it was easy to see over the reference image, but also because I wanted this image to have a simple line art style. Now it's time to starting coloring digitally.
Cleaned digital lines, minus the reference image. I used black because it was easy to see over the reference image, but also because I wanted this image to have a simple line art style. Now it’s time to starting coloring digitally! Yay!

 

Using a large paint brush, I'm painting in the base colors, starting with the darkest colors, and adding fringe highlights.
Using a large paint brush, I’m painting in the base colors, starting with the darkest colors, and adding fringe highlights.

 

Adding in the major colors, mostly greens, grays, and some yellow.
Adding in some more major colors, mostly greens, grays, and some yellow.

 

Continuing with the coloring, and toning down some of the accent colors. Coloring is very back-and-forth work. I bet I spent 80% of my time removing color and then reincluding it over and over again. I wanted to keep the darkest greens in particular. I'm not very good at this yet, but I will get better with more practice.
Continuing with the coloring, and toning down some of the accent colors. Coloring is very back-and-forth work. I bet I spent 80% of my time removing color and then reincluding it over and over again. I wanted to keep the darkest greens in particular. I’m not very good at this yet, but I will get better with more practice.

 

Finalizing the colors and getting closer to the finished work. This is about hour 6 into the process.
Finalizing the colors and getting closer to the finished work. This is about hour 6 into the process.

 

Brightening up the highlights and making those darks even darker -- this is the finished coloring of this version.
Brightening up the highlights and making those darks even darker — this is the finished coloring of this version.

 

A cropped picture of the finished work, horizontally placed, with a pink background for fun.
The finished work, horizontally placed, with a pink background for fun.

 

Filed Under: Art
Rainbow Mushrooms (digital art, coloring)

Rainbow Mushrooms (digital art, coloring)

An ending to the mushrooms I was working on yesterday. After struggling for hours with “natural” tones of the mushrooms, in white, brown, and gray, I rebelled and made them rainbow-colored.

The line art from yesterday's session. Note the color being applied, it is a warm beige; it was sampled from an actual mushroom image.
The line art from yesterday’s session. Note the color being applied, it is a warm beige; it was sampled from an actual mushroom.

 

More coloration, using a warmer color as a base. A lot like with painting -- using burnt sienna as an underlayer.
More coloration, using a warmer color as a base. A lot like painting — using burnt sienna as an underlayer.

 

Nearing the end of my rebellion with color, here is the rainbow theme.
Nearing the end of my rebellion with color, here is the rainbow theme.

 

Zoomed-in color detail for the final mushrooms colors.
Zoomed-in color detail for the final mushrooms colors.

 

The final coloring, with Photoshop modifications for extra Wow.
The final coloring, with Photoshop modifications for extra Wow.

 

This was a fun exercise, and I learned a lot, especially about the inner workings of Sketchbook Pro. I got more familiar with the behaviors of the brushes, and how to merge and separate layers to make the coloring process more forward-moving and less tripping over myself. The splatter-dot brush was entertaining and gave me a lot of texture in this image that I wouldn’t have had otherwise. I look forward to learning even more!

Filed Under: Art
Three Mushrooms (digital art / WIP)

Three Mushrooms (digital art / WIP)

Out on a walk, I found the cutest and most-nicely assembled bunch of mushrooms.

The three mushrooms. The original image I'm using as a reference.
The three mushrooms. The original image I’m using as a reference.

 

I took a picture. Once I got home, I loaded this picture in Sketchbook Pro and started tracing and modifying the lines.

I began to outline the contours of the mushrooms and drew lines of represent their interior texture.
I began to outline the contours of the mushrooms and drew lines representing their interior texture.

 

Continuing to fill in the smaller mushrooms while using the original image as a guideline.
Continuing to fill in the smaller mushrooms while using the original image as a guideline.

 

It is a work-in-progress, so I don’t have the image finalized yet, but seeing the progress in a post like this is helpful for me. It gives me a chance to become more familiar with the image, and share. This is the image showing the line work I’ve done with no background image. As you can see, the line work is very clean and represents the shapes and unique texture of the mushrooms very well. (And we haven’t even done coloring or textures yet, which are to come.)

The current line art, I'm mostly finalized -- all the major shapes are represented with sufficient line detail.
The current line art, I’m mostly finalized — all the major shapes are represented with sufficient line detail.

 

The beginning of testing some colors -- which is the next step: inking.
The beginning of testing some colors — which is the next step: inking.

 

I’m excited to see how this turns out. The playful shapes in the interior of the mushroom were a lot of fun to draw, and gave me some good eye-to-hand exercise. I’m really enjoying the freedom of digital artwork, and the ability to make multiple iterations and moods to the same structural image.

Filed Under: Art
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons